What's the Problem?

 
 

Social and environmental ambitions

Over the past 50 years, the world has seen huge growth and, as a result, an unprecedented deterioration of the natural resources needed to fuel this growth. This has become known as The Great Acceleration as we have entered a new age, the Anthropocene.

It shouldn't be a surprise to learn that there are limits or Planetary Boundaries to this growth. At present, humans are using the equivalent of 1.6 planets to provide the resources necessary to produce goods and absorb waste. If we carry on like this, by the 2030s we will need the equivalent of 2 Earths to support human life. Something has to change - we cannot continue to go overdrawn on our natural capital

 Our home, seen from space: it’s the only one we’ve got and its resources are finite. It’s time for new thinking about how we manage our relationship with the planet

Our home, seen from space: it’s the only one we’ve got and its resources are finite. It’s time for new thinking about how we manage our relationship with the planet

These boundaries serve as an early-warning system, allowing us to act before a crisis level is reached. Business as usual is not an option - we need to transform the way we live, the way we consume the Earth's resources, and the way we do business!

Sustainable development is the only way forward, with an economy that is both regenerative and distributive.

 
 The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a new, universal set of goals, targets and indicators that UN member states will be expected to use to frame their agendas and political policies to 2030. The SDGs are part of a breakthrough global agreement called the 2030 Agenda, adopted at the United Nations on 26th September 2015. Its purpose: to transform the world.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a new, universal set of goals, targets and indicators that UN member states will be expected to use to frame their agendas and political policies to 2030. The SDGs are part of a breakthrough global agreement called the 2030 Agenda, adopted at the United Nations on 26th September 2015. Its purpose: to transform the world.

“The SDGs represent a once in a generation statement of direction for thew whole world, guiding the global agenda for the next decade and longer”
— Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (2015) Rewiring the Economy

Transforming the world seems a pretty daunting challenge. The seventeen Global Goals make it easier to understand. Fortunately, these can be condensed further into six themes:

  1. Basic Needs: Food, water, energy, shelter, sanitation, credit, communications, transport and health for all;

  2. Wellbeing: Enhanced health education, justice and equality of opportunity for all;

  3. Decent Work: Secure, socially inclusive jobs and working conditions for all;

  4. Resource Security: Preserve stocks of natural resources through efficient and circular use;

  5. Healthy Ecosystems: Maintain ecologically sound landscapes and seas for nature and people;

  6. Climate Stability:Limit Greenhouse Gas (GHG) levels to stabilise global temperature rise under 2 degrees Celsius.

Rewiring the Economy (CISL, 2015).

Making the SDGs real in our everyday lives is crucial to their uptake. Fortunately, those lovely folk at Futerra have done the job for us, creating the ‘Good Life Goals’. Watch the video for a great introduction.